Saturday, November 18, 2006

Canine Fitness

(If you don't have a dog, you could also go to the humane society and walk theirs.)

Canine Fitness

Here's a great way to get fit and have fun at the same time — take the dog for a walk! Experts from the University of Missouri-Columbia found that people who walked with a dog on a regular basis lost more weight than those who walked alone. In fact, the weight loss added up to a whopping 14 more pounds per person over a one-year period! And the good news is, it didn't seem to matter whether the participants walked their own dog or one they "borrowed" for the stroll.

The experts speculate that animal companionship helps take the focus off exercise itself, making the outings more enjoyable. And the more people liked it, the more they walked! So start including Fido in your workout — you just might find exercise is something you both look forward to!

MEMBERS GET MORE! Find great walking workouts on Denise Austin's Fit Forever! and discover how easy it is to get fit! Sign up today!



Thursday, November 16, 2006

Dog Urination - Know the Reasons for Dog Urination Problems

Title: Dog Urination - Know the Reasons for Dog Urination Problems

Author: Rena Murray

Article:
Besides the basic elimination reason every creature on the
planet has for "doing business," there are other dog instinctive
behaviors which cause our four-legged friends to have dog
urination problems. They run the gamut from the dog pack
instincts of dog territory marking and dog scent mixing to
female dog urination, dog mating behaviors, submissive
urination, fear-based urination, excitement urination, and
dangerous disrespect of owner authority. So let's explore what
these mean and what you can do about them.

The quest for dominance frequently manifests in dog territory
marking, even dog home urination to claim that territory. What
does that mean? A male dog may begin to mark in the house if
another dog is brought in and not made to be part of the pack.
If you decide to bring a new dog home, walk your present dog and
the new one together, with you in front and in between them,
prior to bringing the new dog inside. Do the walk every day for
at least forty-five minutes. If you already have more than one
dog, you will need to do this with each one. The dogs will take
at least two months to adjust to one another. Treat them
equally, as favoritism is sure to cause a fight.

Female dogs sometimes pee where the male did. Pack members often
cover each other's scent. Either there is jealousy involved, or
the dogs are making sure the neighboring packs know right away
that there is more than one dog here. Outside, don't worry. If
inside, immediately do a mixture of vinegar, Dawn, and water to
remove the scent, or else you will have repeated peeing by all
the dogs. If jealousy is involved, then get help to address that
issue.

There are occasions when a male dog urinates on a female before
he mates with her. It is a way of claiming her that is declared
for some distance.

A dog who pees on his human is neither scared of him nor even
claiming him. He is showing the utmost disrespect. In horror I
heard a wife's account of her naïve husband's child-like report:
"Mommy, Doggie peed on Daddy." Then he said, "That's all right,
Doggie. You couldn't help it." NO! Doggie did not have an
elimination need! That was pure and utter, intentional
disrespect that is symptomatic of far deeper issues. If your dog
does this, do not wait. Consult a professional IMMEDIATELY!

Submissive urination is very common, too. An animal who does
this should be removed from the situation. Do not discipline the
dog; remove him. Showing anger might scare him enough to release
his bowels completely. Clean up the spot when the dog is out of
sight, then bring him back. Repeat the situation over and over.
Remove him when he pees, and pet him when he doesn't. Avoid this
common mistake: Do not pet him to reassure him if he pees, as
that is reinforcement of the unwanted behavior.

Fear-based urination is the hardest of all the reasons to
combat. Do not stand in front of the dog and pull him. He will
shut down and empty his bowels every time. Instead, put the
leash on the top of his neck and pull UP when the dog resists.
Do not make eye contact with him until he surrenders and follows
you. A look at the wrong moment is sometimes just enough for the
dog to shut down.

Excitement urination is among the most common, and luckily
simplest, dog urination problem to cure. Let's say Pepper squats
every time a visitor comes in. What happens is that Pepper is
already excited when the company comes. No one may touch her,
talk to her, or look at her until she has relaxed completely.
Remember, giving Pepper affection when excited will only
increase the excitement and intensify the dog urination problem.
To address the underlying cause, see our articles on controlling
over excitement for further help with Pepper.

About the author:
To end Dog Urination Problems & Obsessive Compulsive Dog Behaviours contact RENA MURRAY at http://www.PawPersuasion.com/
for a coaching session!
This Dog Behaviorist - Dog Obedience
Trainer blends best of the Dog Whisper Behavior and other
methods in no-nonsense Articles, FREE Newsletter - PAW
PERSUASION POINTERS, and Blog -
http://www.pawpersuasion.com/blog/ . Get help at
PawPersuasion.com!

Sunday, November 05, 2006

Pumpkin used as a homeopathic remedy for worming, weight loss, etc

Here's something interesting I just learned yesterday that I thought I would share.

Although I have had dogs all of my life I was unaware that pumpkin is good for the digestive tract. According to my friend, Donnah of Brynbar Setters, "It's also great for if a dog eats a rock, piece of glass or a bone. The fibers in the pumpkin wrap around the foreign object and pumpkin is so slick, it helps move the object through the system".

She recommends home cooked pumpkin or canned pumpkin but not the pumpkin pie filling. Because it has high fiber, it's good for loose stools and also can help if the dog has a blockage.

Donnah also says "If you have fresh pumpkin on hand, dogs will even eat it raw. But here's a warning. If you feed raw pumpkin, it's hard to digest and likely to come out looking much like it did when it went in. Raw pumpkin seeds are also a natural wormer.

Pumpkin is also good for dogs who need to lose weight (as are green beans). Just replace some of their food with twice as much pumpkin".

Donnah raises Gorden and Irish Setters. You can see her beautiful dogs here.
www.brynbar.com




Wednesday, November 01, 2006

Excessive Dog Barking Behavior Problem - How to Stop Compulsive

Title: Excessive Dog Barking Behavior Problem - How to Stop Compulsive
Barking

Author: Rena Murray

Article:
Constant yapping at anything and everything is one of the most
annoying and treatable of the obsessive compulsive dog
behaviors. In our series of articles addressing problem bad dog
behavior, these obnoxious barking dog problems are among those
which are unnecessarily exacerbated by unspent, pent up energy,
yet so frequently overlooked by overly protective owners.
Especially with the smaller breeds... And they drive the owners
and neighbors bonkers! That is what this little ear-splitter did.

This day the small Yorkshire Terrier was barking so loudly I
could not hear his very frustrated owner clearly.
"Quiet!" she commanded loudly in exasperation.

I had a spontaneous "Ouch!" escape from me,
because the woman had forgotten that I was on the other end of
the phone. I shook my head for inner ear equilibrium.

"I am so sorry," she said. It was genuine. The poor thing was
near tears, I could tell. "He just won't be quiet. He barks and
barks and barks -at EVERYTHING! Even if it is a simple noise
with which he is familiar."

The little Yorkshire Terrier was still yapping despite her
desperate plea. He refused to stop ... that incessant yapping
that goes right through you until you want to scream.

So I went straight over to the distraught owner's home. The
little dog, Jake, came charging out, barking furiously and in
such a high pitched tone that it was very hard on the ears.

I corrected Jake with a firm "Hey!" and a stare down. He
understood my body language and surrendered immediately.

"I have had this dog for seven years!" the owner exclaimed. "The
only time he has been this quiet is when he was sleeping." Then
she added, only half kidding: "Can't he sleep all the time?"

She said she had tried numerous medications and some exercise to
soothe Jake's excitement, but nothing had worked. I then learned
that Jake was walked for only fifteen minutes a day, and was
allowed to do whatever he wanted, whenever he wanted.

"Jake becomes excited before the walk," I said. "He must learn
that the leash means for him to calm down. Second, he must be
behind or beside you on the walk, unless you have decided to
give him free time. You are dealing with a very obsessive dog,
and your not giving him leadership is intensifying this bad dog
behavior."

Jake screamed and was like a bucking bronco on the leash as I
made him walk behind me. For less than two minutes, this typical
tantrum kept up. Expect a tantrum of some form. It always
happens.

However, upon seeing that he could not manipulate me, Jake
relaxed and started trotting along like the ideal little dog. It
is all about leadership and control. We took a good long walk.
Warn out by the time I brought him home, Jack took a short nap
right away.

I showed the owner what to do, step by step, and how to correct
Jake. She worked with him diligently every day, and within three
weeks Jake was no longer obsessive in any way. Seven long years
of obsessive compulsive dog behavior with this excessive dog
barking behavior problem -- cured in three weeks of proper
exercise and dog obedience training. Ahhhh ... Nice and quiet
...

About the author:
To end Dog Barking Problems & Obsessive Compulsive Dog
Behavior, contact RENA MURRAY at http://www.PawPersuasion.com/
for a coaching session!
This Dog Behaviorist - Dog Obedience
Trainer blends best of the Dog Whisper Behavior and other
methods in no-nonsense Articles, FREE Newsletter - PAW
PERSUASION POINTERS, and Blog -
http://www.pawpersuasion.com/blog/ . Get help at
PawPersuasion.com!